Simplify Negotiations with the Six Rules of Effective Communication

To negotiate effectively, you must be able to communicate effectively. Unfortunately, most salespeople and businesspeople don’t realize the importance of solid communication skills to the negotiation process. As a result, they lose sales or don’t get the best possible deal.

However, as a salesperson, you are not doomed to the mixed messages and meanings characteristic of poor communication skills. With a conscious effort, all business and sales professionals can overcome the communication barriers that block understanding in negotiation. With a little extra effort, you can improve the delivery of your message to your counterparts and work together toward a mutually beneficial agreement.

Use the following six rules for effective communication to connect with others at the negotiating table and in all forms of communication:

Rule 1: Organize Your Thoughts

Throughout the negotiation process, always allow yourself time to organize your thoughts to avoid conveying the wrong message or confusing the issues. Before you start the negotiation process, and even after it starts, take notes and plan what you’re going to say.

To help you express your thoughts clearly when the negotiations begin, outline in advance the main points you want to cover. Planning the gist of what you’re going to say is the most effective way to avoid sending mixed messages, but don’t stop with that. As the negotiations commence, continue to take notes and plan your responses as you go through the entire process. And remember, no law exists that says every statement must be met with a response within five seconds. Take your time. In fact, silence can be one of your most powerful negotiating tools.

Stop talking whenever you feel like you need to reorganize yourself and before you respond to anything that’s said. And make sure everything you say reflects the true meaning of your thoughts. This tactic not only helps you organize what you’re going to say, but it also helps you digest what your counterpart proposes.

Rule 2: Don’t Think About It; Think Through It

Thinking about something leads to confusion, but thinking through something leads to clarity. The difference between these two processes is a crucial distinction in communication. Many times, people approach negotiations with a mindset of, “Tell it like it is, then let the chips fall where they may.” But by processing an idea through to its logical conclusion, you can evaluate the possible responses you may get from the other side.

For example, if you make an offer and say, “Take it or leave it,” what kind of response would that produce? The other party may say, “Okay, we’ll take it.” They could say, “Thanks, but no thanks.” They could say, “We won’t take it, but here’s what we will accept.” Or they might say, “No one talks to us that way!” and walk out of the room.

A range of possibilities exists, and this tactic requires careful reading of the other person’s reactions. But if you feel from your experiences with the person that they will either accept your offer or your counteroffer, it makes sense to speculate and take the chance. So give some thought to your counterpart’s possible reactions to your points before you actually make them.

Rule 3: Recognize that Actions Speak Louder than Words

Experts say that seventy-five percent of communication is nonverbal. This means that the messages negotiators convey have more to do with their looks, their actions, and the way they say things, than with the actual words they say.

The best negotiators practice saying and doing things in ways that send precisely the message they want to send. The bottom line is that the better you become at using nonverbal communication and reading the nonverbal messages others send, the more effective you can be as a negotiator. Realize that everything you do at the bargaining table is part of the communication and negotiation process. So make sure you don’t send the wrong messages by doing something that conflicts with what you want to say.

Rule 4: Be Concise

Most people tune out a majority of what they hear, so you should always be concise and get right to your point. Say what you mean in as few words as possible, without being blunt. If you drone on, people will stop listening to you. To ensure your message reaches your counterpart, always oversimplify your message, and then elaborate as they ask questions. Repeat your main point several times to emphasize what’s most important.

To boost your negotiating power even more, practice saying everything clearly and concisely, then repeat your key points to yourself again and again. One main problem with negotiation communication occurs when your counterpart gets too wrapped up in what they want to say, that they don’t pay attention to what you say. This is why it is so important to organize your thoughts, and say your main points in a concise, compelling way.

Rule 5: Always Translate Your Message into Benefits for the Other Party

People always listen more carefully when they believe some benefit exists in your message for them. In negotiations, focus on that benefit, even when the underlying purpose of the message is in your favor.

For example, when you interview for a new job, you don’t talk about the huge salary the company can offer you. You talk about all the great skills you can bring to the company, for their benefit. You try to convince them that they’ll be ahead of everyone else by hiring you, regardless of the cost.

As a salesperson, you should always highlight the value of your product or service, rather than the cost. Always talk in terms of what benefits the other party receives as a result of the negotiation terms.

Rule 6: Listen Carefully to the Other Party

If you want to reach a mutually beneficial agreement, you must make sure your message are heard and understood. But don’t get so caught up in your own message that you don’t hear and understand what the other party needs to reach an agreement. Use the following tips for listening more effectively:

  • Open your mind and be receptive to the other party’s message.
  • Make a commitment to listen, and follow through with this commitment as soon as they start to talk.
  • Listen for feelings, as well as facts, and consider the other party’s concerns.
  • Eliminate distractions. Close your door, turn of the radio, and tune in to the other person.
  • Respond to the other party with questions that stimulate conversation and clarify your understanding of his or her message.
  • Take notes on the important points the other party makes, and keep these points in mind as you formulate your responses.

As you improve your listening skills, you increase your negotiating effectiveness by collecting more information to use in your search for solutions. Communication is the Key to Effective Negotiation Communication is a two-way street that requires everyone involved to exchange messages. To negotiate more effectively, you must relate to the other party with strong communication skills. By using these six rules for effective communications, you can overcome barriers, reach a higher level of satisfaction every time you negotiate, and win more sales in the process.

Biography

Presentation Techniques – 7 Ways to Captivate Your Audience

If you’ve been tasked with giving a presentation, you want to impact and impress your listeners. Experienced presenters know that careful preparation is essential. Take the time to consider your strategy in advance and start strong.  Your audience will sum up your style of presenting within the first few seconds, and if it is unexciting, you’ve lost their interest for the rest of your session.

You may even find that your presentation will be captured on video for future use in online events. That means that your lecture will be offered indefinitely, good or bad, so take these tips into consideration and make your presentation count for both your live and virtual audiences!

People Do Judge a Book by its Cover.  Before the audience has the chance to assess you on the quality of content you will be sharing with them, they gauge your professionalism and significance by the way you carry yourself. Wear a jacket, or better yet, a suit. Dark colors, such as black or blue appear most professional and look good on camera as well.  Consider a trim and neat haircut or hairstyle and limit amount of jewelry and accessories.

Learn the Subject, Not the Script. You need to know your subject matter inside and out. The audience is coming to learn from you, hear your ideas, and come away with a slice of your expertise on the topic. Anyone can simply do research on a subject matter, jot down a script and read from it. If your audience witnesses you taking this route, your credibility is weakened, and you’ve just joined the ranks of the “boring presenters”. If your presentation will be available online, you want to make sure your content and delivery is stimulating to avoid being “closed out” prematurely due to lack of interest. Thoroughly knowing the content will also ensure your ability to answer any range of questions asked if you incorporate a Q&A session at the end.

One Theme – Four Main Points. Your overall presentation should revolve around a main theme. And with that theme, try to bullet out up to four points during your speech. Though you have been called upon to provide a presentation and share your knowledge, that doesn’t mean you need to cram everything you know into your slotted delivery time.  Your audience should be able to walk away from your informational session having learned the topic and be able to recount at least two of the main points that were discussed.

Say It, Don’t Display It. Simple and visually stimulating slides are key to an effective PowerPoint presentation. Limit the amount of text on each slide. Narration should come from the presenter and need not be transcribed on the PowerPoint slides.  Slides are great for graphs, charts, statistics, and main bullet points – keep their use limited to that.   Stay away from “eye charts”-slides crammed with so much content that only those with 20-10 vision can read them. They are deadly with a live audience, and even worse online.

Arrive Early.  Nothing shakes nerves like running late to your presentation – trying to beat the clock and set up before your audience starts walking through the door. Allow ample time to arrive, ensure all equipment is working correctly, check the accuracy of your slides, and adjust lights and temperature in the room to comfortable settings. Particularly if your presentation will be video captured, you may face additional technical issues that will take time to resolve. It is also a great idea to find and meet the A/V or technical contact in case you have a glitch and need a quick equipment fix.

Deliver, Don’t Distract. Delivery is an art that is honed with experience and practice; however, even seasoned presenters can keep certain tips in mind during their delivery to ensure they make an impact – in a good way. Avoid distracting movements during your presentation such as touching your face, swaying back and forth, jerky hand motions, and fidgeting with clothes. Hesitations in voice, filler words such as “um” and “uh”, and awkward pauses as you try to find your place are all recipes for a distracted physical and virtual audience. Practice your speech repeatedly. The more comfortable you feel with the subject, your presentation, and its delivery – the more confident you will come across, reducing all the awkward aspects that come with unpreparedness.

Yes, Feedback is Necessary. Though it might be intimidating to open the door to critiques, it shows true professionalism when you ask your colleagues for feedback. It displays your desire to address any weaknesses and your will to work on improving them. Pass out brief questionnaires at the end of your presentation to get your audience’s fresh reaction to your presentation.  Provide the same opportunity for your virtual audience via online polls or surveys. Don’t take the negative comments to heart, incorporate them to make corrections in your next speech. Soak in the numerous positive remarks received and applaud yourself on a successful presentation.

Summary. Relax. You’ve been asked to give a presentation because you are viewed as a person who is knowledgeable, competent, and respected. Imagine yourself in the audience and base the structure of your presentation on what you would find interesting – as far as engaging material and stimulating delivery methods. Keep ideas concise, know your subject matter, and above all else, practice your speech to exhaustion. Your thorough preparation will benefit your physical audience as well as ensure a top-notch delivery each and every time your session is selected and downloaded by virtual viewers.

Strict Adherence to Safety Programs Presents Effective Outcomes in Handling Hazardous Drugs

Various studies have presented reports on exposure of healthcare workers to hazardous drugs. The drug preparation areas are found to be contaminated with these drugs and there exists legion of cases of workers with detectable quantities of these agents in their urine. It is the responsibility of workers together with employers of different healthcare settings to participate actively in controlling the extent of their exposure to these harmful substances.

Workers carry out different drug related processes and thus are exposed to dusts and aerosols which generates out during preparation and administration of the drug. These may present direct risks of exposure through skin contacts and through contaminated eatables and food stuffs.

According to safe handling guidelines published by the healthcare organizations, workers should follow various precautionary measures and activities to carry out safe handling of hazardous drugs. Only well-trained and experienced workers should form the part of the healthcare settings. Employers should ensure the implementation of safety equipments such as biological cabinets and closed system drug transfer devices, and give importance to their proper usage by the workers.

With the assistance of workers, several written programs on safe handling of these toxic substances have been presented by healthcare settings. These programs discuss various issues on drug exposure and practice of engineering controls, hygiene controls, safety equipments, etc. to minimize the worker’s exposure to hazardous drugs.

Strict adherence to the safety guidelines and co-operation of workers with employers will definitely improve the prevailing conditions of drug exposure in healthcare facilities. The use of personal protective equipments and good work practices have shown to dramatically change the scenario of harmful effects of occupational exposure to these drugs.